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It is the injunction of the sastra that a sannyasi, a brahmacari, are sons of the society. As you take care of your children at home, similarly, you are also required to take care of the sannyasis and the brahmacaris

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"it is the injunction of the śāstra that a sannyāsī, a brahmacārī, are sons of the society. As you take care of your children at home, similarly, you are also required to take care of the sannyāsīs and the brahmacārīs"

Lectures

Srimad-Bhagavatam Lectures

It is the injunction of the śāstra that a sannyāsī, a brahmacārī, are sons of the society. As you take care of your children at home, similarly, you are also required to take care of the sannyāsīs and the brahmacārīs. Because their life is dedicated for the social welfare work. Without any charge.


Lecture on SB 2.3.17 -- Los Angeles, July 12, 1969:

So this king, being tired, being thirsty, entered the home of a sage, and he was in meditation. So the king called him. Because he was king, so he is habituated to order. A king is not supposed to submit, although they submitted to great sages and Brāhmins. But generally, their spirit is ordering, commanding spirit. So he commanded, "Give me a glass of water. I am very thirsty." So that sage, who was in meditation, could not hear him. The king became little angry that, "I am your guest. I am king. I am asking you water, and you are not hearing me. You are in your meditation." So he became little disgusted, and there was a dead snake. So he took that dead snake and got it round about the neck of the sage and went away in disgust, that "This sage did not offer me even a glass of water."

Because, according to Vedic system, if somebody comes in your home, even if he is enemy, it is the injunction of the Vedas, gṛhaṁ śatrum api prāptaṁ viśvastam akuto 'bhayam. When a person comes at your home, never mind even if he's enemy . . . friend is welcome, that's all right; but even an enemy comes, they are not forbidden. Not that in the gate there is, oh, "Beware of dog," "No trespasser allowed." No. There was no restriction. Even enemy was admitted, "Come on." So gṛhaṁ śatrum api prāptaṁ viśvastam akuto 'bhayam. Even an enemy enters your house, you'll receive him in such a friendly way that he will forget that you are his enemy. That was the system.

So because Mahārāja Parīkṣit was king, he saw that there is negligence of this disciplinary action. "I became . . . I was king, and I was thirsty. I became his guest, I came . . ." Athiti. This guest is called athiti. Athiti means there are some guests who give notice before, prior to coming there, and some guests come without any notice. So the guest who comes without any notice, he's called athiti. So according to Hindu custom, the householder is to keep always some foodstuff for athiti guest. Somebody may come without notice, so some foodstuff is already in the stock. That is called athiti food.

And a gṛhastha, the householder, is ordered that before eating, a householder was to see in the members of the family first the children must be fed, then diseased person must be fed, then elderly, old person must be fed. In this way, when everything is finished, then the proprietor of the household, he will take his meals, and before taking his meal, he will stand outdoors and call loudly, "If somebody is hungry, please come. Still there is food here." And if there is no response, then he'll take. This is the system of Vedic civilization.

So when Mahārāja Parīkṣit saw that, "This sage, although he's sage, he's to be ideal man, he did not hear me. I am thirsty, I asked him water, and . . ." The injunction is, when you receive somebody, even if you are very poor man, you should offer the guests a comfortable seat and a glass of water. That is not expensive. You can offer anyone a seat, "Please come and sit down here and take a glass of water." And if you can provide, you can give him nice foodstuff; but even if you have got nothing at your home, this thing you can offer without any expenditure, without any botheration, to receive him, "Please come up, come here, sit down. Take a glass of water."

That is the system still. In Indian villages . . . just like we are sannyāsī, renounced order. There is no problem. You sit down underneath a tree and so many residents will come: "My dear sannyāsī, will you please come and take prasādam?" So many people invite. When Caitanya Mahāprabhu was traveling alone, wherever He goes, He was invited. That system is still there. A sannyāsī is never hungry. So many people will provide him.

And it is the injunction of the śāstra that a sannyāsī, a brahmacārī, are sons of the society. As you take care of your children at home, similarly, you are also required to take care of the sannyāsīs and the brahmacārīs. Because their life is dedicated for the social welfare work—without any charge. This our Kṛṣṇa consciousness society is giving the most valuable thing, chanting of Hare Kṛṣṇa, without any charge, without any . . . they are canvassing, "Please take it. You'll be happy. Please take." So people should know how much valuable service they are rendering. How much valuable.