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In India still the system is a householder keeps at least, in the village, at least ten to twelve cows. But he hasn't got to pay anything for keeping these. The cows go to the pasturing ground and in the evening comes back

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Expressions researched:
"in India still the system is a householder keeps at least, in the village, at least ten to twelve cows. But he hasn't got to pay anything for keeping these. The cows go to the pasturing ground and in the evening comes back"

Lectures

Bhagavad-gita As It Is Lectures

The whole day's business was that he would go to a householder. Because in India still the system is a householder keeps at least, in the village, at least ten to twelve cows. But he hasn't got to pay anything for keeping these. The cows go to the pasturing ground and in the evening comes back. And some grass, dry grass which is by-product of the grains, that is offered to her, and instead of, in place she offers milk. So milk in the village, still it is available very easily, without any expenses.


Lecture on BG 3.17-20 -- New York, May 27, 1966:

Now, Haridāsa Ṭhākura, at dead of night a woman came before him and she was sitting. She (he) was chanting. So according to this restriction or injunction, she (he) has committed wrong. No. She (He) has not committed wrong, because he was trying for her benefit. He was sitting there not with the purpose of sense gratification; he was sitting with that woman with the purpose of converting him (her) for self-realization. He had no other intention. His only intention was, "Well, this poor creature has come to me. Never mind whatever her intention is. And if I am elevated, if I have anything, anything relationship with my Supreme Lord, I must do something good to this poor creature so that his (her) life also may become successful. That was his intention. He had no other intention. Therefore, naiva tasya kṛtena arthaḥ. Therefore for him there is no restriction. There is no restriction.

And nākṛtena iha kaścana: And neither he has got any obligation that he has to do this or that. Neither by doing he has got any reaction, or neither by not doing he has to pay something, default, something like that. Na cāsya sarva-bhūteṣu kaścid artha-vyapāśrayaḥ. And he has no relation with anybody to take anything from them.

Now so far this self-satisfaction stage is concerned, Śukadeva Gosvāmī is the ideal person. He was living naked, and in the early in the morning he would stand up in any householder's door. Because in India still, I think here also the system is there, those who have got private cows, they milk the cow early in the morning. Early in the morning if the cow is milked, it gives the proper quantity of milk. That is the system, before sunrise.

So Śukadeva Gosvāmī and . . . the whole day's business was that he would go to a householder. Because in India still the system is a householder keeps at least, in the village, at least ten to twelve cows. But he hasn't got to pay anything for keeping these. The cows go to the pasturing ground and in the evening comes back. And some grass, dry grass which is by-product of the grains, that is offered to her, and instead of, in place she offers milk. So milk in the village, still it is available very easily, without any expenses.

Now Śukadeva Gosvāmī, because his whole day's business was just to stand before a householder's door, because every householder milking, and people know that this svāmījī or this sage has come to take some milk. "Oh, Bābā, whatever you want you take." So what? Say one pound or less than one pound drinks and goes away. The whole day was finished business. So Śukadeva Gosvāmī was doing like that. He wouldn't go anywhere, and simply, early in the morning, he would stand before a householder's door and take little milk and the whole day he would travel naked.

He . . . he has recommended that, "Why you are anxious?" You, I mean to say, those who are in the renounced order of life, those who have left the world simply for self, spiritual realization . . . so Śukadeva Gosvāmī advises that, "You, if you have actually left home for spiritual realization, then you haven't got any problem for maintaining your life. You have no problem."

So he recommends, cīrāṇi kiṁ pathi na santi. "Well, I am naked." Of course, you do not wish to run on as naked. You require some cloth. All right, find out some cloth in the street. There are so many cloth thrown in the street. So you can pick up one of them. So your cloth problem is there solved. Cīrāṇi kiṁ pathi na santi diśanti bhikṣāṁ naivāṅghripāḥ. Aṅghripāḥ, aṅghripāḥ means these trees. They have got fruits.

So you can ask a tree, apple tree, to give you some apples to eat. So your clothing and eating problem is solved. All right, then your shelter . . . ruddhā guhāḥ kim. Oh, you find out some cave. There is nice place. So the house problem is solved. Then water? There are many rivers. There is no water problem. So he has recommended like that.

And actually, in India still there are persons who do not care for anything of the world. They are ātma-rati, ātma-rati. They are self-satisfied, doesn't care, doesn't care for anything. So for such person there is no need of doing any yajña or purifying their activities or so many things as recommended in the rituals.