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Perfect knowledge must be there, vijanatah. When one is actual knower of the things, tatra ko mohah, then there is no illusion. Illusion is for him who does not know things

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Expressions researched:
"Perfect knowledge must be there, vijānataḥ. When one is actual knower of the things, tatra ko mohaḥ, then there is no illusion. Illusion is for him who does not know things"

Lectures

Sri Isopanisad Lectures

Perfect knowledge must be there, vijānataḥ. When one is actual knower of the things, tatra ko mohaḥ, then there is no illusion. Illusion is for him who does not know things. But one who knows, there is no illusion. Tatra ko mohaḥ kaḥ śoka. No lamentation. When you are perfectly in conviction that there is nothing except Kṛṣṇa, and Kṛṣṇa's energy, the same, then there is no moha—moha means illusion—and śoka.


So their ekatvam, Māyāvāda philosophy's ekatvam, oneness, and our ekatvam of oneness—a little different. They say that the energy's false; the Brahman is real. Brahmā satyaṁ jagan mithyā (Śaṅkarācārya). We say that because Brahman is truth, therefore His energy's also truth. That is the difference between Vaiṣṇava philosophy and Māyāvāda philosophy.

We cannot say that energy is false. Energy is temporary. This external energy is temporary, not false. Although . . . suppose we have got some trouble. There are so many kinds of troubles pertaining to the body, mind, external affairs. But that trouble comes and go. But when the trouble is there, it is true. We feel the consequence. We cannot say it is false. The Māyāvādī philosophers say that it is false. But when he's troubled, why he's so much disturbed?

So that is not false. Therefore this very word is used: vijānataḥ, "one who knows." Perfect knowledge must be there, vijānataḥ. When one is actual knower of the things, tatra ko mohaḥ, then there is no illusion. Illusion is for him who does not know things. But one who knows, there is no illusion. Tatra ko mohaḥ kaḥ śoka (ISO 7). No lamentation. When you are perfectly in conviction that there is nothing except Kṛṣṇa, and Kṛṣṇa's energy, the same, then there is no mohamoha means illusion—and śoka.

Moha and śoka, this is also explained in the Bhagavad-gītā: brahma-bhūtaḥ prasannātmā na śocati na kāṅkṣati (BG 18.54). We were very much anxious to get things which we haven't got. That is kāṅkṣati, hankering after. And when things are lost, we lament. But if we know that Kṛṣṇa is the central point, so anything received, gained, profited, that is Kṛṣṇa's desire. Kṛṣṇa has given; accept. And if it is taken away by Kṛṣṇa, then what is the lamentation? Kṛṣṇa liked to take it away from me. Oh, why should I lament? Because ekatvam, the Supreme One, He's the cause of all causes. He's taking; He's also giving.

So when you have got something, engage it in Kṛṣṇa's service. And we have no . . . nothing to offer Kṛṣṇa, then whatever you get, patraṁ puṣpaṁ phalaṁ toyam (BG 9.26), Kṛṣṇa is satisfied in every way. This is the meaning of vijānataḥ. One must be in the full knowledge. Then there will be no more lamentation and no more hankering. That is the stage of spiritual platform.

brahma-bhūtaḥ prasannātmā
na śocati ne kāṅkṣati
samaḥ sarveṣu bhūteṣu...
(BG 18.54)

Then you can see everyone on the same platform, that everyone is a spiritual spark. Na vijugupsate. Then you do not say: "Oh, he's lower; he's higher. He's intelligent, he is fool." That is also confirmed in the Bhagavad-gītā: paṇḍitāḥ sama-darśinaḥ (BG 5.18). Paṇḍitāḥ means learned. He's vijānataḥ, one who knows.

So in the Vedic literature, you won't find something different in Bhagavad-gītā and some things different in Īśopaniṣad or something is different in the Vedas. No. They are the same thing is explained in different languages in different scriptures. But one has to know the art, how to understand them.

Thank you very much.