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I'll give you one practical example. In my householder life I was a drugstore businessman. So one Muhammadan gentleman, he was supplying me bottles

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"I'll give you one practical example. In my householder life I was a drugstore businessman. So one Muhammadan gentleman, he was supplying me bottles"

Lectures

Srimad-Bhagavatam Lectures

I'll give you one practical example. In my householder life I was a drugstore businessman. So one Muhammadan gentleman, he was supplying me bottles. So by doing this bottle business he accumulated some money. So one day I asked this old man, his name was Abdula. "Well, Mr. Abdula, you have got some now money, I can understand. So how you are going to use it?"


Lecture on SB 7.6.1 -- Montreal, June 10, 1968:

Suppose you are a businessman. Formerly, in any part of the world . . . we have seen in your country, in my country, there are many old churches, old mosques, old temples. In India there are temples just like a fort—acres of land occupying big, big temples. So who has constructed these temples? Must be rich men, businessmen, landlords, princely order. Why? Because they wanted to satisfy God.

Either you manufacture . . . either you construct a church or temple or mosque, it does not matter. The idea behind is that he wanted that he has labored so hard, he has accumulated so much money, "Let me spend something for God." But at the present moment there are so many skyscrapers, but nobody is constructing a nice church. This is the result of godless civilization. The mentality is changed, that formerly they . . . this bhāgavata-sūtra is saṁsiddhir hari-toṣaṇam (SB 1.2.13).

I'll give you one practical example. In my householder life I was a drugstore businessman. So one Muhammadan gentleman, he was supplying me bottles. So by doing this bottle business he accumulated some money. So one day I asked this old man—his name was Abdula—"Well, Mr. Abdula, you have got some now money, I can understand. So how you are going to use it?" So he said: "My dear sir, I am thinking of constructing a mosque." He was Muhammadan. Just see his mentality, that he wanted . . . he accumulated some money, but now he wants to satisfy God, constructing a big temple or constructing . . .

You'll find in India some old temples, there are so many nice workmanship in stone. That means spent thousands and thousands of dollars. In here also I find so many nice churches, they have been spent by persons. What is the idea? The idea is anyone who has got some money, he wanted to satisfy God. So it doesn't matter what you are doing, but the test of your success will be considered as successful if you try to satisfy God.

Because we are, whole life, we are dragging from God, "God, give us our daily bread," and God is supplying daily bread. Otherwise, where you are getting bread? You say: "I am purchasing from the market." Oh, where the storekeeper got this wheat? It is produced by agriculture. But do you think that simply by machine it is produced? No. Unless there is some natural favorable condition, you cannot produce.

There are five causes—the land, labor, capital, organization, and Bhagavad-gītā accepts daiva, another cause. Daiva means godly. You may arrange everything, but if God is against you, in spite of your all arrangement, everything will be failure. That is described in the Bhagavad-gītā. They have searched out five causes for successful. So out of the five causes, daivadaiva means the favor of God—that has been taken as the means for any successful thing.